Recognizing an emergency and paying your bill

Recognizing an emergency and paying your bill

Recognizing an emergency and paying your bill. It is every parent’s worst fear. It’s midnight and your child is sick. How do you know when to take him to the emergency room?

It may be tempting to rush your child to the ER at the first sign of trouble, but it’s never a good idea to visit your local hospital without good information. An unnecessary trip to the ER can result in hours of waiting. If the occasion is non-emergency, those with emergency conditions will be treated first, and if your “emergency” is not really an emergency, the hospital may refuse to treat you once you’ve been triaged. Is.

Recognizing an emergency and paying your bill
Recognizing an emergency and paying your bill

If your child is under one year old and has a fever over 100 degrees, a call to your pediatrician and a visit to the ER are warranted. If your baby is over a year old, fever alone is not enough reason for a visit to the ER. A fever can be treated with over-the-counter ibuprofen or acetaminophen until you get to your pediatrician’s office. If fever is accompanied by headache, rash, neck stiffness or pain, severe vomiting, convulsions, or lethargy, call your doctor and make an emergency room appointment. Other reasons for an ER visit are severe right lower abdominal pain. Coughing or vomiting blood and unresponsiveness.

Non-urgent emergency department

In addition to lost time. Your insurance company may not pay for non-emergency emergency department visits. Most insurance companies have “fair use” policies to cover ER visits. If the claims adjuster believes that a reasonable person would believe that the symptoms presented at the time of the visit were an emergency. The claim will be paid. The problem with this system is that it is highly subjective and there is little recourse if you disagree with the results. Even if your insurance company pays. ER visits are often covered by large deductibles and co-pays.

If your child is sick in the middle of the night. There are options. Many emergency departments have a phone nurse on staff. The nurse can give advice or just reassurance. She can also tell you if you have a true emergency that requires a visit. If you call ahead and get authorization in advance. You can avoid the long waits often associated with ER visits. Your doctor’s office may have a 24-hour number or book on common children’s health problems and solutions.

Having a sick child can make you feel helpless. But with some forethought and good information. You can provide the best care for your child.